Community-led initiatives in Norway

From EcoliseWiki


Overview

Transition in Norway

Main page: Transition in Norway

The Transition Network lists 4 initiatives in Norway.[1]

Transition Norway runs a Facebook group[2] and there are local hubs in different areas spread around Norway.[3]

Permaculture in Norway

Main page: Permaculture in Norway

The Norwegian Permaculture Association, founded in 1987, lists 2 LAND centres, 2 LAND learners and 5 local networks.[4]

Ecovillages in Norway

Main page: Ecovillages in Norway

The Global Ecovillage Network (GEN) lists 4 project in their database. This number is however only reflecting the projects that have registered themselves on the database. The ecovillage database contains ecovillage projects of all sizes and in all stages of development.[5]

The ecovillages in Norway are organized in Norske Økosamfunn Forening (NOF). NOF, the “Norwegian ecocommunities Society is a non-profit association whose purpose is to contribute to sustainable development by supporting the realization of ecocommunities or other measures that may promote a more ecological or holistic way of life and values that are in line with this objective“.< https://okosamfunn.no/om-nof/</ref>

NOF is also a full member of GEN-Europe, the European branch of the Global Ecovillage Network.


ECOVILLAGE EXAMPLE

Hurdal Økolandsby´s vision is for “something completely new. Between four and five hundred people will move into a village in which sustainability and quality of life are linked together in a way that allows you to enjoy the best of two worlds. (…) Hurdal municipality has made a strong commitment to a sustainable future for its inhabitants and nature. The municipality has decided to make Hurdal center a "sustainable urban village". The goal is to make Hurdal carbon neutral by 2025 while at the same time increasing economic growth and increase the quality of life for residents and visitors”.[6]

Community Energy in Norway

Main page: Community energy in Norway

Solidarity Economy in Norway

Main page: Solidarity economy in Norway

Community Food Production in Norway

Main page: Community Food Production in Norway

According to URGENCI, the International Network for Community Supported Agriculture, the first CSA in Norway was established in 2006 close to Oslo. The URGENCI report "Overview of Community Supported Agriculture in Europe" names 35 operative CSAs in 2015 providing for an estimated 5.000 – 6.000 people with more initiatives in development. While there is no Norwegian CSA umbrella organisation, the CSAs are coordinated within and supported by Oikos - Organic Norway, who runs the CSA website Andelslandbruk and created a guide on how to start a CSA. [7]

According to Elin Rømo Grande from Oikos, “one of the challenging aspects for the development and expansion of CSA in Norway is the lack of farmers and gardeners with knowledge and experience on how to grow more than only a few different varieties of vegetables, and how to do it organically” but also states an increased interest and support by governmental bodies as seen in recent “adjustments in agricultural, but also educational policies, (which) could improve the conditions for the development of the CSA model“.[8]

„The national goal, enacted by the Norwegian Parliament in 2009, is to achieve 15% organic production and consumption by 2020. The Norwegian Agriculture Agency is mandated to stimulate organic production and consumption to achieve this goal. This agency has actively supported the development of CSA in Norway by financing the feasibility study for CSA in Norway, the follow-up project to establish pilot CSAs as well as an ongoing project led by Oikos - Organic Norway to further develop the model in Norway. In addition, some municipalities and county governors have provided financial and technical support for the establishment of CSAs“.[9]


Other(s)

Collaboration with Local Government

Intersections and Interactions

References

  1. https://transitionnetwork.org/transition-near-me/initiatives/. Accessed on June 10th 2018
  2. https://transitionnetwork.org/transition-near-me/hubs/norge/. Accessed on June 11th 2018
  3. https://transitionnetwork.org/country/no/. Accessed on June 11th 2018
  4. http://www.permakultur.no. Accessed on June 15th 2018
  5. https://ecovillage.org/projects. Accessed on May 28th 2018
  6. https://www.hurdalecovillage.no/omoss. Accessed on May 28th 2018
  7. Volz, P., Weckenbrock, P., Cressot, N. & Parot, J. European CSA Research Group (2016): Overview of Community Supported Agriculture in Europe. https://urgenci.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Overview-of-Community-Supported-Agriculture-in-Europe.pdf. Accessed on June 7th 2018
  8. European CSA Research Group (2016): Overview of Community Supported Agriculture in Europe. https://urgenci.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Overview-of-Community-Supported-Agriculture-in-Europe.pdf. Accessed on June 7th 2018
  9. Volz, P., Weckenbrock, P., Cressot, N. & Parot, J. European CSA Research Group (2016): Overview of Community Supported Agriculture in Europe. https://urgenci.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Overview-of-Community-Supported-Agriculture-in-Europe.pdf. Accessed on June 7th 2018